Mon, 23/02/2015 - 19:00
52 Prince St New York, New York 10012-3309 United States

A priest in Ireland grapples with his collusion in clerical abuse in John Boyne’s new novel, A History of Loneliness, a study of the abuses of power within the Catholic Church and a savage portrait of small town society in 1970s Ireland. Joseph O’Connor calls it “brave, righteously angry, and stunning.” Join Boyne and Colm Toibin, author, most recently of the magnificent Nora Webster, for a conversation about the methods we use to make sense of our complicity in atrocity.

John Boyne is the author of numerous works of fiction, including The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, a young adult novel that became an international bestseller and was made into an award-winning film. He is the recipient of two Irish Book Awards, the Bistro Book of the Year, and numerous international awards. He lives in Dublin, Ireland.

Colm Toibin is the author of seven novels, including the much and deservedly praised Nora Webster; The Blackwater Lightship;The Master, winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Brooklyn, winner of the Costa Book Award; and The Testament of Mary, as well as two story collections. Twice shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Tóibín splits his time between Dublin and New York.

Thu, 12/02/2015 - 19:00
Glucksman Ireland House New York University One Washington Mews New York, NY 10003 U.S.A.

Join us in welcoming New York Times bestselling author Colm Toibin as he returns to Glucksman Ireland House to read from his critically acclaimed eighth novel, Nora Webster.

Set in Ireland, the novel follows the story of a young mother as she struggles to find herself and overcome her sorrow after the death of her husband, and finds a path to solace through the simple act of singing. A stunning novel from one of Ireland’s most eminent novelists, Nora Webster has been called “heart-rendingly transcendent” by The New York Times, and “may actually be a perfect work of fiction.” (The LA Times)

Colm Tóibín has three times been shortlisted for the Booker Prize. He is a graduate of University College Dublin, and serves as Mellon Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He currently lives in New York.

Tue, 10/02/2015 - 19:00
Instituto Cervantes 211 East 49th Street 10017 Nueva York

Martin Luther King was assassinated on April 4th, 1968. Based on the recent declassification of FBI files regarding this case, Antonio Muñoz Molina reconstructs the crime, escape, and capture, in his latest novel, Como la sombra que se va. This thrilling account leads us into essential topics of universalliterature, which he will discuss with writer Colm Toibin, such as the difficulty of faithfully recreating the past, the fragile character of an instant, the construction of identity, the accidental as the engine of reality or the vulnerability of human rights.