Wed, 25/04/2018 - 19:30
MURMRR BALLROOM 17 EASTERN PKWY BROOKLYN, NY, 11238 HTTP://WWW.MURMRR.COM/

Beloved author of the novel Brooklyn and many others, Colm Tóibín will read from his latest novel, House of Names, to celebrate its paperback release. He's joined by and will be interviewed by Carys Davies, winner of the Frank O'Connor Short Story Award, on the release of her first novel, West. Both authors will be available to sign books afterward.

Sun, 22/04/2018 - 18:30 - 20:00
PULITZER HALL, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, 2950 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY

Written by Colm Tóibín for the actress Lisa Dwan, Pale Sister is a dramatisation of the voice of Ismene, sister of Antigone, who recounts Antigone’s defiance of the King as pressures mount on Ismene to act to vindicate her sister, or even follow her example. It arises from “The Antigone Project,” a course taught at Columbia University by Lisa Dwan and Colm Tóibín, which explores the ways the ideas animating Antigone–conscience versus law, defiance versus might, protest versus order, the individual versus authority, and a woman’s powerlessness emerging as power–have found expression at different times throughout history. There were versions made in France during the Nazi Occupation, in Ireland during the Troubles, in Germany after the war, in South Africa during apartheid, and among the Pakistani community in contemporary London.

This staged reading by Lisa Dwan runs for one hour and fifteen minutes and will be followed by a discussion with Colm Tóibín and Lisa Dwan, chaired by Patricia Dailey.

Presented with the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, The Society of Fellows and Heyman Center for the Humanities, and the Dart Center for Journalism & Trauma at Columbia University.

Sat, 21/04/2018 - 14:30 - 16:00
DIXON PLACE, 161A CHRYSTIE STREET, NEW YORK, NY

Colm Toibin’s latest novel House of Names tells the story of Clytemnestra and Agamemnon, Orestes, Electra and Iphigenia but Toibin drew on contemporary proponents of extreme violence — the Boston marathon bomber, ISIS, and a shocking ambush of Irish Protestants during the Troubles — to reach his understanding of how to write about these Ancient Greek murderers. Aminatta Forna’s Happiness similarly draws on the brutal modern wars in Bosnia, Sierra Leone, and Iraq to illuminate an African trauma psychiatrist’s evolving attitude toward how his profession should understand — and treat — individuals traumatized by violence. Two of today’s outstanding lyrical authors of fiction discuss their approaches to writing about this extremely tough topic.